Blog post 1-1

From the runways to the after parties, here’s what our team will be carrying during New Zealand Fashion Week. Image: launchemtrics.com/spotlight. Early starts and late nights are pretty much a given during the hectic schedule that is New Zealand Fashion Week. With its diverse array of shows, installations, lunches and after parties, the need for a reliable companion becomes paramount. Whether that takes the form of a trusty tote or an elegant clutch, a well-chosen handbag is an indispensable accessory during such weeks. Beyond its ability to provide the finishing touch to an already stellar ensemble, it also serves as a vessel for keeping an assortment of essentials on hand. As our team coordinates their itineraries and plans their outfits, one question remains: what does an FQ editor carry in their handbag during fashion week?   Here’s what they said: Sarah Murray, Editor-in-chief Yu Mei Scrunchie Vi in ‘Day Blue’, $619. With a short ‘scunchie’ handle and a longer one, this works perfectly as a clutch or a cross body. Armani Luminous Silk Foundation, $118, from Smith & Caughey’s. For me this foundation is light and easy to apply. It melts into the skin providing coverage but also lets your skin shine through. Kosas Revealer concealer, $54, from Mecca. A light concealer that you can easily reapply throughout the day.  Charlotte Tilbury Matte Revolution in ‘Pillow Talk’, $59, from Mecca. Just my absolute favourite lipstick at the moment. I wear it most days, and currently am using a darker liner to accentuate the lip line.  Montblanc Notebook #146, $120. I would be lost without my Montblanc notebook to write down notes. Because it’s bright green it’s easy to find in the depth of a big bag, but equally brightens up any desk. Mother Earth Roasted and Salted Cashews. If I have a big day I’ll often take some cashews with me when I need an on-the-go snack.  The Virtue Holy Smoke Parfum 10ml, $69. The Virtues Holy Smoke (10ml) this pint sized pick fits in any bag/pocket. I adore the rich cinnamon bark, clove and tonka bean mix.  Bottega Veneta Sunglasses, $715, from Superette. I wear my Bottega Veneta sunglasses most days – so I wouldn’t go to Fashion Week without them. They’re the kind of choice that seem to go with everything…  July Power Bank. I used various iterations of a charging bank over the years and most barely charge your phone – however upon a top influencer-backed recommendation I’m ordering the July one asap. Let’s just hope it arrives in time…  Louise Dunn, Digital editor Georgia Jay Torta in Chalk, $650. Don’t let its fair hue fool you, this is one of the most low-maintenance bags in my modest repertoire. It has a soft and buttery leather, and slings under your shoulder easily while offering a deceptive amount of storage.  Tatcha The Kissu Lip Mask, $52, from Mecca. Few products can infuse my lips with long-lasting hydration like the Tatcha lip mask. Between coffees, cocktails, and conversations, this little beauty is going to be doing overtime for NZFW.  Guerlain Terracotta Luminizer, $110, from Smith & Caughey’s. This long-wearing powder works like a second skin to warm up my complexion and adds a sweep of shimmer – ideal to apply between shows for a fresh look-alive appearance.  La Mer The Eye Concentrate, $465, from Mecca. For when I need to fool people into believing I’ve had a full eight hours the night before.  NARS Radiant Creamy Concealer in Vanilla, $58, from Mecca. I’m all for practicality. I subbed in this reliable, blendable, and buildable concealer earlier this year when I couldn’t replace a Givenchy rendition –  and I have no temptation to look back.  An Organised Life 2023 A5 Daily Planner, $65. Despite being digital editor, I still go back to a trusty pen and paper to document any clever quips or revelations post-presentation to revisit later. Since An Organised Life closed its doors, this will be my last fashion week with the iconic diary in tow.  Abel Odor Cyan Nori, 15ml, $140. With hints of plant-derived musk, and punchy notes of tangerine and peach for a salty, deep-sea dry-down, this fragrance carries me from morning to evening with ease.  Prada Symbole sunglasses in Camel Beige, $740. I’ve never been particularly precious about sunglasses; I need to be able to fold them and throw them into my bag with next to no care. I bought these when I was in Milan in 2022 and continue to thrash them (even if everyone practically has them now).  BePure InnerStrength, $69. In a bid to curve burnout, I reach for vitamins to keep me afloat. And there’s no brand I trust more than BePure to see me through.  Avene Eau Thermale, 50ml, $13, from Life Pharmacy. More make-up than usual can often increase my skin’s sensitivity. This mist has been my go-to for more than a decade. I recommend it to everyone. Amberley Colby, Editorial assistant Brie Leon Everyday Croissant Bag, $274. On days where I’m out for long periods of time and need to carry a range of things, this bag is my absolute go to. Not only is it chic and complements just about any look, but it can fit all of my essentials and then some.  Dior Addict Lip Glow Oil in ‘Cherry’, $70.  I generally err towards gloss over lipstick, and this Dior one is a staple in my repertoire. Non-sticky, pigmented, hydrating and shiny all at once, this is my hack to the perfect pout.  M.A.C Lustreglass Sheer-Shine Lipstick in ‘Thanks, it’s M.A.C!’, $47. For those moments where I do feel I need a little extra something, I love layering this sheer nude lipstick over my aforementioned gloss. It’s lightweight and ever-so-slightly pearlescent, but not over-the-top.  Tarte Shape Tape Ultra Creamy Concealer, $56, from Sephora. Sadly, the bags under these eyes aren’t Prada, which means a good concealer is a must during a long day of shows. A little goes a long way with this one, so I like keeping one on hand in case I’m in need of a little reviving.  Kikki K Skyline Notebook, $38. With my phone as my calendar, I keep this trusty notebook in my arsenal for scribbling down copious notes throughout the week. Serious Food Co Sea Salt popcorn. When the urge to snack arises, a little crunchy sodium hit usually does the trick. Curio Noir Pablo 4ml Pocket Parfum, $50. With its creamy, smokey and sophisticated scent profile, this mini pocket parfum takes me from day to night with ease.  Lu Goldie Aurelie sunglasses, $129, from Ruby. Less is more for me when it comes to glasses, so I adore the simplicity of these semi-classic cat eye frames. Tangle Teezer Original, $25.95, from Farmers. This mane needs maintenance, so you’ll never catch me anywhere without a hair brush.
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The knitwear collection you need to be investing in now
It’s no secret that Aotearoa is home to a variety of talented knitwear brands, but here’s one that definitely deserves a spot on your radar. Imagery: supplied. Established in 2013 by founder Christina Grant, Perriam is based in the idyllic village of Tarras in the South Island of Aotearoa. Born to a mother and father who owned a sheep station and wool shop in the region, Grant’s love affair with merino dates back as early as childhood, which ultimately led her to follow in their footsteps by founding her own luxury knitwear label.  About the Perriam spring/summer collection This week, the brand unveiled their latest collection for Spring/Summer 23/24 in what is their first ever collaboration with artist and designer Meg Gallagher, whose talents have seen her work in Australia for the likes of Camilla & Marc and Ksubi. With Gallagher helping to guide the direction of the collection, this range draws its tonal inspiration from the idyllic Central Otago landscape which Grant grew up in, featuring a delightfully earthy palette of warm nutmeg, sand, pine and hazelnut. Designed with timelessness and durability in mind, the collection champions a variety of fabrics and silhouettes, including the transeasonal Ultrafine Merino, and the soon-to-be-released Merino Cotton blend seen in crew and v-neck sweaters, collared jerseys, classic t-shirts and tanks. Moving into summer, there will also be several maxi and midi dress styles arriving in lightweight fabrications accompanied by an effortlessly-cool linen suit set that invites year round versatility. Ideal pieces to be worn alone or layered together, each style is crafted to encourage the wearer to pause and feel the fabric, savouring the tactile beauty that natural fibres and quality craftsmanship bring to the clothing.  Imagery: supplied. Imagery: supplied. Perriam's guide to caring for your knitwear While the sun shines brighter during the day, the early mornings and late evenings often leave us feeling a little chilly during the spring season, reminding us not to retire our woolly layers just yet. Merino, with its exceptional ability to adapt to varying body temperatures, is therefore the perfect fibre to invest in during the warmer months – a fact well understood by local knitwear brand, Perriam. Below, they share their expert tips: To remove odours, leave woollen garments outside. They love sunshine and fresh air – just like us. Moth holes happen because wool and other animal fibres contain keratin, which clothes worms love to eat. Be sure to clean your knitwear before you put it away as moths can be attracted to food stains and moisture. Moths also hate lavender, so consider storing your knits with a bag of dried lavender. Pilling is a natural process that can be hard to prevent, caused simply by the rubbing of fibres in a garment. To help prevent it, when you wash your knits, make sure they are inside-out, and don’t use fabric softener. Running a cool iron over a woollen garment after it has been washed and dried can also help smooth the fibres. When pilling does occur, remove pills with a sweater stone. When pilling occurs it isn’t an indication of low quality, it occurs because of the superior softness of the fibres used. Brushing wool with a clothes brush can shake out dirt and dust that dulls its appearance. Imagery: supplied. Want to try the collection in person? Perriam has three stores throughout Aotearoa in Tarras, Wanaka, and Christchurch. 
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Your guide to party dressing this celebration season
Shimmer, spice, and everything nice. Consider this your guide to dressing up this party season. We don’t know about you, but when celebration season rolls around, the best part about receiving an invite to something is having an excuse to dress up. From Christmas lunches, to work functions and New Years’ parties, there are countless opportunities over the coming weeks to bring a bit of drama into your wardrobe. And while there’s no one-size-fits all for party dressing – unless there’s a specific dress code that is – we sure do love bringing in a bit of sparkle.   Be it a bedazzled accoutrement or a timeless LBD, we’ve rounded up just a few of the glamorous sartorial additions you might want to consider for your party wardrobe this season.  Read on below for our shoppable guide. Isabel Marant 'Leila' top, $959, from Workshop Meadowlark ‘Galaxy’ necklace, $2289 Louis Vuitton ‘Blossom’ sandal, $2130 H&M Rabanne ‘Beaded Disc’ earrings, $99 Cadman Rock ‘Warrior’ Hand Hammered bangle, $499 Alaïa pearl belt, $3489, from Faradays Self-Portrait 'Sequinned Tulle' midi dress, $1130, from Net-a-Porter Tiffany & Co ‘Diamond Wire’ bracelet, POA Storm 'Fire Eyes' top, $249 Rolex ‘Explorer 40’ watch, $12,500 H&M Rabanne ‘Sequin Disc’ mini dress, $399 Balenciaga ‘Hourglass’ XS handbag, $10,530 Meadowlark ‘Fizzy’ ring, $3135 Prada Satin cover for Iphone 14 Plus, $825 Pandora ‘Moments Charm’ keyring, $89 Cartier ‘Panthère De Cartier’ watch, $49,800, from Partridge Jewellers Oséree ‘Gem Embellished Chain’ bra, $455, from Mytheresa

Blog post 1-2

Blog post 1-3

From the runways to the after parties, here’s what our team will be carrying during New Zealand Fashion Week. Image: launchemtrics.com/spotlight. Early starts and late nights are pretty much a given during the hectic schedule that is New Zealand Fashion Week. With its diverse array of shows, installations, lunches and after parties, the need for a reliable companion becomes paramount. Whether that takes the form of a trusty tote or an elegant clutch, a well-chosen handbag is an indispensable accessory during such weeks. Beyond its ability to provide the finishing touch to an already stellar ensemble, it also serves as a vessel for keeping an assortment of essentials on hand. As our team coordinates their itineraries and plans their outfits, one question remains: what does an FQ editor carry in their handbag during fashion week?   Here’s what they said: Sarah Murray, Editor-in-chief Yu Mei Scrunchie Vi in ‘Day Blue’, $619. With a short ‘scunchie’ handle and a longer one, this works perfectly as a clutch or a cross body. Armani Luminous Silk Foundation, $118, from Smith & Caughey’s. For me this foundation is light and easy to apply. It melts into the skin providing coverage but also lets your skin shine through. Kosas Revealer concealer, $54, from Mecca. A light concealer that you can easily reapply throughout the day.  Charlotte Tilbury Matte Revolution in ‘Pillow Talk’, $59, from Mecca. Just my absolute favourite lipstick at the moment. I wear it most days, and currently am using a darker liner to accentuate the lip line.  Montblanc Notebook #146, $120. I would be lost without my Montblanc notebook to write down notes. Because it’s bright green it’s easy to find in the depth of a big bag, but equally brightens up any desk. Mother Earth Roasted and Salted Cashews. If I have a big day I’ll often take some cashews with me when I need an on-the-go snack.  The Virtue Holy Smoke Parfum 10ml, $69. The Virtues Holy Smoke (10ml) this pint sized pick fits in any bag/pocket. I adore the rich cinnamon bark, clove and tonka bean mix.  Bottega Veneta Sunglasses, $715, from Superette. I wear my Bottega Veneta sunglasses most days – so I wouldn’t go to Fashion Week without them. They’re the kind of choice that seem to go with everything…  July Power Bank. I used various iterations of a charging bank over the years and most barely charge your phone – however upon a top influencer-backed recommendation I’m ordering the July one asap. Let’s just hope it arrives in time…  Louise Dunn, Digital editor Georgia Jay Torta in Chalk, $650. Don’t let its fair hue fool you, this is one of the most low-maintenance bags in my modest repertoire. It has a soft and buttery leather, and slings under your shoulder easily while offering a deceptive amount of storage.  Tatcha The Kissu Lip Mask, $52, from Mecca. Few products can infuse my lips with long-lasting hydration like the Tatcha lip mask. Between coffees, cocktails, and conversations, this little beauty is going to be doing overtime for NZFW.  Guerlain Terracotta Luminizer, $110, from Smith & Caughey’s. This long-wearing powder works like a second skin to warm up my complexion and adds a sweep of shimmer – ideal to apply between shows for a fresh look-alive appearance.  La Mer The Eye Concentrate, $465, from Mecca. For when I need to fool people into believing I’ve had a full eight hours the night before.  NARS Radiant Creamy Concealer in Vanilla, $58, from Mecca. I’m all for practicality. I subbed in this reliable, blendable, and buildable concealer earlier this year when I couldn’t replace a Givenchy rendition –  and I have no temptation to look back.  An Organised Life 2023 A5 Daily Planner, $65. Despite being digital editor, I still go back to a trusty pen and paper to document any clever quips or revelations post-presentation to revisit later. Since An Organised Life closed its doors, this will be my last fashion week with the iconic diary in tow.  Abel Odor Cyan Nori, 15ml, $140. With hints of plant-derived musk, and punchy notes of tangerine and peach for a salty, deep-sea dry-down, this fragrance carries me from morning to evening with ease.  Prada Symbole sunglasses in Camel Beige, $740. I’ve never been particularly precious about sunglasses; I need to be able to fold them and throw them into my bag with next to no care. I bought these when I was in Milan in 2022 and continue to thrash them (even if everyone practically has them now).  BePure InnerStrength, $69. In a bid to curve burnout, I reach for vitamins to keep me afloat. And there’s no brand I trust more than BePure to see me through.  Avene Eau Thermale, 50ml, $13, from Life Pharmacy. More make-up than usual can often increase my skin’s sensitivity. This mist has been my go-to for more than a decade. I recommend it to everyone. Amberley Colby, Editorial assistant Brie Leon Everyday Croissant Bag, $274. On days where I’m out for long periods of time and need to carry a range of things, this bag is my absolute go to. Not only is it chic and complements just about any look, but it can fit all of my essentials and then some.  Dior Addict Lip Glow Oil in ‘Cherry’, $70.  I generally err towards gloss over lipstick, and this Dior one is a staple in my repertoire. Non-sticky, pigmented, hydrating and shiny all at once, this is my hack to the perfect pout.  M.A.C Lustreglass Sheer-Shine Lipstick in ‘Thanks, it’s M.A.C!’, $47. For those moments where I do feel I need a little extra something, I love layering this sheer nude lipstick over my aforementioned gloss. It’s lightweight and ever-so-slightly pearlescent, but not over-the-top.  Tarte Shape Tape Ultra Creamy Concealer, $56, from Sephora. Sadly, the bags under these eyes aren’t Prada, which means a good concealer is a must during a long day of shows. A little goes a long way with this one, so I like keeping one on hand in case I’m in need of a little reviving.  Kikki K Skyline Notebook, $38. With my phone as my calendar, I keep this trusty notebook in my arsenal for scribbling down copious notes throughout the week. Serious Food Co Sea Salt popcorn. When the urge to snack arises, a little crunchy sodium hit usually does the trick. Curio Noir Pablo 4ml Pocket Parfum, $50. With its creamy, smokey and sophisticated scent profile, this mini pocket parfum takes me from day to night with ease.  Lu Goldie Aurelie sunglasses, $129, from Ruby. Less is more for me when it comes to glasses, so I adore the simplicity of these semi-classic cat eye frames. Tangle Teezer Original, $25.95, from Farmers. This mane needs maintenance, so you’ll never catch me anywhere without a hair brush.
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The knitwear collection you need to be investing in now
It’s no secret that Aotearoa is home to a variety of talented knitwear brands, but here’s one that definitely deserves a spot on your radar. Imagery: supplied. Established in 2013 by founder Christina Grant, Perriam is based in the idyllic village of Tarras in the South Island of Aotearoa. Born to a mother and father who owned a sheep station and wool shop in the region, Grant’s love affair with merino dates back as early as childhood, which ultimately led her to follow in their footsteps by founding her own luxury knitwear label.  About the Perriam spring/summer collection This week, the brand unveiled their latest collection for Spring/Summer 23/24 in what is their first ever collaboration with artist and designer Meg Gallagher, whose talents have seen her work in Australia for the likes of Camilla & Marc and Ksubi. With Gallagher helping to guide the direction of the collection, this range draws its tonal inspiration from the idyllic Central Otago landscape which Grant grew up in, featuring a delightfully earthy palette of warm nutmeg, sand, pine and hazelnut. Designed with timelessness and durability in mind, the collection champions a variety of fabrics and silhouettes, including the transeasonal Ultrafine Merino, and the soon-to-be-released Merino Cotton blend seen in crew and v-neck sweaters, collared jerseys, classic t-shirts and tanks. Moving into summer, there will also be several maxi and midi dress styles arriving in lightweight fabrications accompanied by an effortlessly-cool linen suit set that invites year round versatility. Ideal pieces to be worn alone or layered together, each style is crafted to encourage the wearer to pause and feel the fabric, savouring the tactile beauty that natural fibres and quality craftsmanship bring to the clothing.  Imagery: supplied. Imagery: supplied. Perriam's guide to caring for your knitwear While the sun shines brighter during the day, the early mornings and late evenings often leave us feeling a little chilly during the spring season, reminding us not to retire our woolly layers just yet. Merino, with its exceptional ability to adapt to varying body temperatures, is therefore the perfect fibre to invest in during the warmer months – a fact well understood by local knitwear brand, Perriam. Below, they share their expert tips: To remove odours, leave woollen garments outside. They love sunshine and fresh air – just like us. Moth holes happen because wool and other animal fibres contain keratin, which clothes worms love to eat. Be sure to clean your knitwear before you put it away as moths can be attracted to food stains and moisture. Moths also hate lavender, so consider storing your knits with a bag of dried lavender. Pilling is a natural process that can be hard to prevent, caused simply by the rubbing of fibres in a garment. To help prevent it, when you wash your knits, make sure they are inside-out, and don’t use fabric softener. Running a cool iron over a woollen garment after it has been washed and dried can also help smooth the fibres. When pilling does occur, remove pills with a sweater stone. When pilling occurs it isn’t an indication of low quality, it occurs because of the superior softness of the fibres used. Brushing wool with a clothes brush can shake out dirt and dust that dulls its appearance. Imagery: supplied. Want to try the collection in person? Perriam has three stores throughout Aotearoa in Tarras, Wanaka, and Christchurch. 
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Your guide to party dressing this celebration season
Shimmer, spice, and everything nice. Consider this your guide to dressing up this party season. We don’t know about you, but when celebration season rolls around, the best part about receiving an invite to something is having an excuse to dress up. From Christmas lunches, to work functions and New Years’ parties, there are countless opportunities over the coming weeks to bring a bit of drama into your wardrobe. And while there’s no one-size-fits all for party dressing – unless there’s a specific dress code that is – we sure do love bringing in a bit of sparkle.   Be it a bedazzled accoutrement or a timeless LBD, we’ve rounded up just a few of the glamorous sartorial additions you might want to consider for your party wardrobe this season.  Read on below for our shoppable guide. Isabel Marant 'Leila' top, $959, from Workshop Meadowlark ‘Galaxy’ necklace, $2289 Louis Vuitton ‘Blossom’ sandal, $2130 H&M Rabanne ‘Beaded Disc’ earrings, $99 Cadman Rock ‘Warrior’ Hand Hammered bangle, $499 Alaïa pearl belt, $3489, from Faradays Self-Portrait 'Sequinned Tulle' midi dress, $1130, from Net-a-Porter Tiffany & Co ‘Diamond Wire’ bracelet, POA Storm 'Fire Eyes' top, $249 Rolex ‘Explorer 40’ watch, $12,500 H&M Rabanne ‘Sequin Disc’ mini dress, $399 Balenciaga ‘Hourglass’ XS handbag, $10,530 Meadowlark ‘Fizzy’ ring, $3135 Prada Satin cover for Iphone 14 Plus, $825 Pandora ‘Moments Charm’ keyring, $89 Cartier ‘Panthère De Cartier’ watch, $49,800, from Partridge Jewellers Oséree ‘Gem Embellished Chain’ bra, $455, from Mytheresa
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Fashion designer Healy is the local rising star
Rising fashion star Dominique Healy has achieved sartorial success in Australia, and now she’s brought her transeasonal designs and sustainable production back to Aotearoa for the next leg of her creative journey   In the heart of Mt Eden in Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland, the creative hub of fashion label Dominique Healy is making itself at home. Having relocated to New Zealand in 2022 after several years in Melbourne, its founder found the perfect spot for her retail store and studio in the historic village. “I wasn’t planning to open a store — I was just looking for a studio space because I needed somewhere to design,” says Healy (pictured opposite). “I used to work in-store but hadn’t for the past few years because I’d been in the studio full-time, so it’s quite refreshing getting direct feedback from people again, because I haven’t had it for so long.”  When FQ sits down with Healy in her new space enclosed within charming exposed-brick walls, she’s wearing one of her own merino ‘Vera’ tees with a pair of high-waisted jeans — a combination that embodies her brand’s intention to prioritise comfort. Cool, calm and collected on home turf, she has immediate plans to work on building her local customer base. Established in Mebourne in 2017, her eponymous label has gained fans in both Australia and New Zealand for her quality transeasonal pieces and focus on conscious production, but the majority of her customers are still based across the Tasman, so although opening a bricks-and- mortar store in New Zealand wasn’t initially on the cards, the opportunity it has provided for direct interaction in this neck of the woods is proving positive. Healy’s made-to-order pieces are crafted from predominantly deadstock materials and mostly made in-house, with a small portion of production outsourced to an ethically accredited factory in Melbourne. To her, sustainable production isn’t a trend, but something she thinks should be standard practice for the entire fashion industry. “I feel like it’s almost at a point now with a lot of brands where you get a bit tired of [hearing they’re] doing this and that. [Sustainable production] should just be the way it is.” Fabric and fashion are lifelong passions for Healy. “I’ve been making clothes since I was a kid,” she says. “My auntie started teaching me when I was eight and I’d sew every weekend. I went to classes at Spotlight… I’ve just always loved making clothes.” While studying fashion design at Auckland University of Technology, she worked part-time at what’s now called The Fabric Store, and continued to work for them in a wholesale capacity after moving to Melbourne. Developing a penchant for buying rolls of fabric soon prompted Healy to start designing her own pieces. “I couldn’t stop buying fabric — a lot of fabric,” she says. “I either needed to stop buying fabric or give [my label] a proper go, so I decided to give it a go because I didn’t want to stop!” Healy began dabbling, selling her designs at weekend markets. “A couple of my friends from The Fabric Store were doing the same thing at the same time, so we started booking pop-ups,” she says. “It was a good way to get in front of people because [in many ways] that was the hardest part.” It wasn’t long before the trio made the decision to start working on their labels full-time and opened a store called Before March, in which they stocked their labels alongside that of other local and international designers. Although Healy left the business when she moved home, the store remains a loyal stockist, one of several throughout Australia and Aotearoa, and online.     Fusing luxurious textiles with timeless silhouettes, Healy seeks to achieve a sense of polished practicality with her pieces. She’s partial to unique prints and pops of vibrant colour, with red, purple and green making regular appearances. She doesn’t cite a specific muse, but often designs with her mother and sister in mind. “There are aspects of [my label] that I make for me, my mum and my sister,” she says. “It’s almost like I try to make different sections for each of us. You want to be presentable, but you also want to be comfortable.” Two of her best-selling styles — the ‘Bella’ blouse and ‘Anna Frill’ blouse — are testament to that. Relaxed fits with oversized sleeves, it’s no wonder these fluid yet elegant pieces are top performers. For Healy, designing is less about the aesthetic and more about the feeling. “Comfort is generally a pretty big one for me, while still making things look nice,” she says. “I enjoy making dressy clothes, but I mainly just want to make things that I can wear every day.” Another of Healy’s goals is to establish a clearer production split between her Auckland and Melbourne studios. At the time of writing, she was set to travel back to Melbourne to shoot her latest collection, something she hopes to try to do in Auckland as her operations become more streamlined. Massive growth has never been a focus, but Healy would like to open another production space in New Zealand at some stage, and maintain her roots in Melbourne by opening a store there. But, she says, “My main goal is just to get things feeling good and to keep making.” There’s little doubt that Healy will continue moving from strength to strength — and her ultimate ambition? To be able to balance her brand with a bach lifestyle. “I’d love to live close to a beach, whether in Auckland or a couple of hours away. I think I’d be pretty happy with that.”   This article originally appeared in Fashion Quarterly‘s Winter 2023 issue. 
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Where to stay, sup, and shop in Auckland
Consider this your definitive guide to navigating Aotearoa’s biggest fashion event with style. Image: launchemtrics.com/spotlight. As we countdown to what will be the first New Zealand Fashion Week in three years (thanks, Covid), the excitement is mounting in our local fashion community. Traditionally, NZFW has maintained an industry-centric focus during its weekday shows, reserving access for the general public only for the weekend presentations, but this year has brought about a refreshing change. The upcoming event – scheduled to run from August 29th to September 2nd, 2023 – promises an extended array of weekday and weekend shows accessible to the public.  Whether you’re local to Tāmaki Makaurau/ Auckland or are journeying from out of town, we’ve curated the ultimate guide to navigating this busy week including where to stay, where to dine and where to shop during Aotearoa’s biggest fashion event of the year.  Where to stay From 10am each each day, there will be back-to-back shows from some of the industry’s biggest names and notable up and comers, so staying within close proximity of the venue will be a necessity for retaining your stamina for the week. With the majority of shows taking place onsite at the Viaduct Events centre, there are an abundance of luxurious lodging options within walking distance, including NZFW’s official hotel partner for the year, M Social.  Image: M Social Harbour Suite. M Social Located a mere 600 metres from the venue, a stay at M Social would mean that you can nip back and forth between shows with ease, whether for make-up touchups, an outfit change, or the quickest of power naps. With 190 contemporary rooms on offer, many of which have views overlooking Princes Wharf, and a range of dining and fitness facilities within arms reach, this is a fuss-free option for those wanting to stay close to the action. Better yet, as the official hotel partner for NZFW this year, you can score 20% off your stay by booking through the NZFW website. Image: Park Hyatt Suite. Park Hyatt As the closest hotel to the venue out of our list of accommodations, Park Hyatt gives you a literal front row seat to all of the action throughout the week. With its sleek, chic fit-out that plays host to four restaurants and bars, a day spa, a 25-metre infinity pool, and a full fitness centre, this hotel epitomises luxury in all its forms. At just a two minute walk from the venue, you can easily pop back for a little post-show massage or facial. Image: QT King. QT Auckland There’s a lot to love about the QT Auckland, from its quirky furnishings to its generously-sized rooms. Located just a stone’s throw from the venue, we also love it as an accessible option to stay in during NZFW. Home to the esteemed Esther restaurant, you’ll be able to fuel up on culinary delights around the clock, with a range of room service offerings also available during your stay. And to cap off a long day of show hopping? We recommend celebrating with a glass of bubbles or two at the hotel’s coveted rooftop bar.  Where to eat Though there’s guaranteed to be a range of gourmet treats available on site throughout the duration of the week thanks to Savor Group (who is an official partner of NZFW), it’s likely you’ll be needing some dining recommendations to keep you energised for all those moments in between. Here are our top picks for staying satiated all week long: Bivacco This Italian focused restaurant opened its doors late last year, and since then it has quickly earned a place as one of our favourite dining spots in the city. Situated close to the venue, you can head here for a long lunch, a post-show dinner or a casual tipple at your leisure. Offering a range of classics such as pipe rigate and tiramisu, we expect this to be a hot spot during NZFW. Williams Eatery In the mood for hearty lunch? Williams Eatery has you covered. Serving a mix of local and intentionally inspired dishes, consider this your one stop shop for great food and coffee. While we’re certainly partial to their premium pasture eggs on Daily Bread sourdough, we recommend their octopus scramble for something a little more adventurous.  Soul Bar and Bistro A place to see and be seen in, Soul Bar is an institution for locals of all walks of life. While often frequented as a celebration spot or as a Friday night after work drinks destination, its Soul’s unpretentious yet delicious menu that keeps us coming back time and time again. For a truly soulful experience, consider trying one of their signature cocktails with a dish of their famous mac and cheese. Trust us, you won’t regret it. Where to shop What we wear to NZFW is an important consideration that is often planned weeks in advance. Though we’re sure to get an abundance of new style inspiration from watching designers debut their new collections, what’s fashion week without a little pre-show shopping spree?  Commercial Bay Since it opened in mid 2020, this premium shopping precinct has become our go-to destination for when we’re in need of some retail therapy. Home to more than 100 fashion, beauty, and dining locations, you’ll find everything from local favourites such as Wynn Hamlyn and Kate Sylvester (whose NZFW show we’re extremely excited for) to luxe international labels like Kate Spade and Sandro. With an assortment of casual and more high-end dining options scattered throughout the precinct, you can easily spend hours here without running out of things to do.  Britomart After a lengthy trip to Commercial Bay, you can make your way down to Britomart, home to labels like Maggie Marilyn, Deadly Ponies, FABRIC, and more. Surrounded by top eateries and bars, you can wet your whistle between visiting the stores of some of Aotearoa’s best designers. Whether it’s a full length gown or a ‘jeans and nice top’ combo you’re in search of, there’s something for everyone here.
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Meet the FQ team: Digital editor Louise Dunn
Meet the FQ team making NZFW Kahuria 2023 happen. @louisedunn___ NZFW is back after a three-year hiatus and Fashion Quarterly is your all-access pass, bringing you exclusive backstage content, the very best street style, interviews with top fashion designers and models, runway reviews and beauty breakdowns. What’s your role at Fashion Quarterly? In short: everything that is published on the FQ.co.nz, our social media channels, and in our weekly newsletter has either been written or edited by me. Content creation and curation, writing/editing, and visual content management are the primary tasks of the digital editor and are complemented with several strategic tasks like SEO and analytics, adapting to digital trends, and audience engagement. I collaborate with our art director Georgia to iterate on our ‘look and feel’ and support our editor in chief Sarah with commercial content and the odd article for print. I couldn’t tackle the sheer quantity of tasks under the digital veil without the muscle of our editorial assistant Amberley and a few others who assist with workflow, client bookings, and managing our digital platforms (you know who you are).   What will your focus be at NZFW? Being open-minded and providing support to our local designers – new and established – by way of attending and reporting on their shows, any noteworthy trends, and relaying it back to our readers. We plan on being active on the FQ Instagram and wrapping up each day with a daily digest on FQ.co.nz, so stay tuned.  When did you attend your first NZFW and what’s your standout memory from it? The first NZFW I attended was in 2018 as a digital content producer. The digital editor at the time was lapping it up in Europe so it was initiation by fire in terms of producing and publishing content around the clock. It was a whirlwind of a week and I loved every minute of it. The people, the parties, and the atmosphere of each show was so unique, it was intoxicating. The Stolen Girlfriends Club show was a standout, as was a particular Maggie Marilyn outfit that I wore that was so ~elite~ at the time.  What has been your favourite NZFW show/collection to date? Kathryn Wilson and Trelise Cooper have always turned out immaculate energy but it’s always the shows with the most ‘wearable now’ pieces that I feel most inspired by. In 2018, it’d be a tie between Wynn Hamlyn and Rachel Mills. But Hej Hej taking over a yacht in the Viaduct was pretty fabulous.  What show(s) are you most looking forward to this year? This year will be unlike previous years for many reasons. But I suspect the NOM*d show will be a highlight in terms of vibes and Zambesi for its collection. Given that this is Kate Sylvester’s 30th anniversary, I imagine she’ll be executing something special, too.  What kind of trends or themes are you hoping to see on the runway this year? Everyday chic – pieces that look polished, elegant and feminine in their silhouette but utilise very unfussy fabrics. I adore contrast like big masculine layers over sheer and supple textiles. I’m super curious to see which colourways emerge.  What’s your key to making the week go smoothly? Preparation is pretty key. Knowing what I’m going to be wearing ahead of time frees up my mental space to focus on being in the present. Oh, and a little self-compassion, too. During NZFW you’re not eating normally, sleeping regularly, or able to fulfil your routine which can feel jilting to any progress. But it’s such a privilege to have this opportunity and finding space during the week to appreciate that goes a long way.  What’s your NZFW style? Honestly, who knows? This year feels the most cavalier yet. I’ll be focused on comfort and chic outerwear. I’m at the age and stage where I feel pretty comfortable in myself to wear pieces however unglamorous with conviction. But if I had a budget to fulfil my wildest dreams, it would be oversized tailoring, relaxed mens knitwear, and beautiful pointed-toe pumps.  Keep up with Louise and the FQ team at NZFW by following us on Instagram.

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Ostentatious symbols of wealth were far less frequently observed on the recent runways. Is it becoming a no-no to wear your money on your sleeve? Loewe SS16. Image: launchemtrics.com/spotlight. Attendees at the Versace Fall 2023 show held in Los Angeles earlier this year were hard-pressed to spot a Medusa head; the Italian house’s famous logo featured only subtly on buttons and earrings. The clean lines of the rooftop of West Hollywood’s Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood provided the backdrop for a collection that echoed the building’s minimalist form. Instead of Versace’s typical more-is-more offering, celebrity guests (including Elton John, Dua Lipa and Cher) saw sharply tailored suits, streamlined dresses, denim and eveningwear that was glamorous yet restrained. Although sculptural, even the sweeping, floor-length gowns featured a painterly polka-dot print that felt surprisingly demure when styled with satin gloves that hit just below the elbow. “I wanted to go back to the cut and shape of the clothes, to concentrate on the perfect little black dress, the perfect black suit,” said Donatella Versace of her offering — a stark contrast to what we’ve previously seen from the fashion house. Rewind to Pre-Fall 2022, for which Versace collaborated with Fendi’s Kim Jones and Silvia Venturini Fendi, each swapping sides to design 25 looks for a show dubbed Fendi by Versace in a sartorial game of musical chairs that resulted in an explosion of logomania. Varying iterations of logos featured on every one of the 50 looks, in all-over prints, chunky necklaces, shoulder straps, belt buckles, jacket trim, lace, diamantés and more. It was fashion that’s unapologetically flashy, not to mention instantly recognisable. The ‘logomania’ trend first gained traction in the Spring 2016 collections, with brands such as Louis Vuitton, Loewe, Lanvin and Gucci making their logos work overtime. Around this time, it was Gucci’s then creative director Alessandro Michele’s distinct brand of kaleidoscope romanticism that set the tone for fashion’s now-minimalist mood. Today, although logomania still lingers, recent versions are much more subtle. Case in point is the head-to-toe monogrammed Valentino look Zendaya wore to attend the label’s show in Paris late last year. The actor’s bodysuit, blazer and shortswere covered in twinkly Vs, yet somehow seemed low-key. Echoing Versace’s focus on cut and shape, the general mood of the Fall 2023 international runway circuit was one of restraint. Collections predominantly featured black, grey and more grey, silhouettes were dialled down to their essence, and the glitzy looks of yesteryear were nowhere to be seen. Gucci SS16. Image: launchemtrics.com/spotlight. The Miu Miu Fall 2023 collection felt distinctly tamer than seasons past, thanks to sensible silhouettes and a utilitarian palette consisting of khaki, olive and, you guessed it, grey. Just a year earlier, for Fall 2022, model Adut Akech sported a latticework diamanté two-piece layered over a powder-blue bra and bloomers, complete with satin ballet flats that became ‘It’ shoes, “the shoes to be seen in this autumn” according to British Vogue. It’s hard to imagine an item from the Fall 2023 show taking on such popularity, cult status having been rejected in favour of an anonymity of sorts. “A little serious,” was how Miuccia Prada described her show to Vogue Runway reporter Anders Christian Madsen. “I like to embrace that in this moment. Maybe I’m too careful about what’s happening around us, but I can’t leave fashion like some place of nonsense. There’s some excitement and sexiness there, but basically, I think we have to dress for thinking and for starting fresh.” As the cost of living and interest rates continue to rise, so too does the likelihood of a recession. Perhaps that’s what she meant by “serious”. Historically, with a recession comes a wave of minimalist fashion — during the Great Depression in the 1930s, the ritzy flapper dresses of the ’20s were swapped for two-piece suits with lengthened skirts. In the 1990s, clean tailoring and gritty ‘heroin chic’ replaced the razzle-dazzle and shoulder pads of the ’80s economic boom. The crash of 2008 made way for ‘normcore’ and ‘indie sleaze’. In April of this year, the headline of an i-D article by Megan O’Sullivan on the Fall 2023 season read: “The Return of Normie Fashion Marks a Cultural Reset”. It’s a common belief that fashion is a sign of the times, so why, in a climate of looming hardship, are phrases like ‘stealth wealth’ and ‘quiet luxury’ entering the cultural lexicon, stirring up debates around privilege one cashmere sweater at a time? Flashing your cash when people in the world are struggling could be seen as poor taste, but it’s hard to imagine the real-life equivalents of the Succession’s billionaire Roy siblings worrying about anyone but themselves. “She’s brought a ludicrously capacious bag,” said actor Matthew Macfadyen as the show’s Tom Wambsgans, critiquing a woman who had misread the room and brought the accessory to a birthday party at which the unspoken dress code was presumably ‘stealth wealth’. “What’s even in there? Flat shoes for the subway? Her lunch pail? Greg, it’s monstrous. It’s gargantuan. You can take it camping. You can slide it across the floor after a bank job.” The scene went viral, spurring countless memes and TikToks. Around the same time, Gwyneth Paltrow made headlines for the understated outfits she wore to court during her Utah skiing-accident trial. (The price tags were not so understated, including that of the unassuming cashmere sweater by Italian label Loro Piana that retails for around $2585.) “There’s always been something chic about dressing classic and understated; while the [term] might be a fad, it’s always been around,” says New York-based Kiwi stylist Madeleine Hocquard Jones of the ‘quiet luxury’ trend. “You could always buy a white Prada T-shirt for $500. I don’t know how big quiet luxury could ever become when it appears to be exclusive to the wealthiest 3% of the world. It’s hardly aspirational to save all your coins to spend $2000 on a grey cashmere sweater. The idea of being so wealthy that you’ve ascended above the need to display it isn’t new, but it’s more out of touch as a fashion concept today than ever.” Shop these ‘ludicrously-capacious’ bags: Louis Vuitton ‘Neverfull MM’ tote, $3300. Yu Mei ‘Teresa’ tote, $1259. Deadly Ponies ‘Crush’ tote, $999. Mansur Gavriel ‘Everyday Soft’ tote, $795, from Nordstrom. In Aotearoa, an IRD investigation released in April reported that “the data, based on full income information from 311 of our wealthiest citizens, shows that the average person in this group pays an effective tax rate of just 8.9% on their economic income — that is, income from all sources, including capital gains on investments”. In comparison, someone on a salary of $80,000 with no other income would pay more than double that amount of tax. Combine this with the increasing cost of living, and ‘quiet luxury’ and ‘stealth wealth’ feel redundant, concepts reserved for TV screens and the court appearances of the rich and famous. Meanwhile, the luxury resale market is on the rise, providing broader access to luxury goods while also being a barometer of where longevity truly lies when it comes to design. Head of fine jewels, watches and luxury accessories at Webb’s auction house, Christine Power, identifies some key styles in the leathergoods arena. “Quota bags by Hermès are highly sought after as they’re rare and difficult to acquire. We’re seeing a perpetual increase in interest across the New Zealand secondary marketfor [Hermès] ‘Birkin’, ‘Kelly’ and ‘Constance’ bags as purchasing them new often requires a lengthy wait. “We’re also seeing a major uptake in structured bags by Louis Vuitton, including the ‘Pochette Accessories’, the ‘Alma’ and tote styles,” she continues. “Classics from Louis Vuitton continue to hold steady as many people are gearing up to travel. The timeless look of monogrammed ‘Keepall’ and epi-leather options are popular as they’re durable, high-quality and designed to last a lifetime. Caviar-leather flap bags from Chanel are also trending as they’re quality pieces with low supply and high demand.” Maybe Tom Wambsgans was wrong after all. Madeleine Hocquard Jones also sources and collects vintage Chanel, selling a selection of pieces via Instagram account @order_no5. “Chanel is so much more than the clothes — it’s a story,” she says of the label’s unwavering appeal. “It has such a deep heritage and long legacy of being luxurious, meticulous, versatile and glamorous. Its designs endure through every generation, in part because icons of every generation have worn it, from pop stars to royalty. This gives Chanel that great sense of timeless transcendence. It’s never a fad, it’s Chanel, and when you buy Chanel from any era, you’re buying into a legacy we all want to be a part of.” Maybe, rather than getting caught up in a flurry of buzzwords and micro-trends, luxury is best viewed through a lens of longevity. Whether plastered in logos or discreetly tailored, the true value comes in knowing that a piece will stand the test of time, enduring not only in terms of quality but also one’s ever-changing tastes and whims.
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5 trends from Milan Fashion Week that you can wearing
As we say ‘ciao!’ to another Milan Fashion Week, it’s time to take a look at the trends that were dominating the catwalk. Cavalli SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com As another week in the spring/summer ‘24 fashion circuit comes to a close, we’re once again turning our attention to the runways for insight into what’s new and trending for the coming seasons. Home to many of the industry’s most iconic houses (read: Prada, Max Mara, Fendi and Armani), Milan Fashion Week stands as one of the most anticipated weeks in the fashion calendar. While we’re continuing to see established trends such as double denim and leather reign supreme, this week gave us a fresh serving of sartorial trends that have us excited for warmer days. Below, we take you through five trends that have been seen everywhere this week that you can start wearing now. Ferretti SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com Prada SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com 1. Western front If we have one takeaway from Milano, it’s that fringe and tassels are most definitely here to stay. Many iterations of the Western-style trend were seen across the runways this week, including at Alberta Ferretti, Moschino, Cavalli and Prada – to name only a few. Featured on everything from bags to skirts to coat hems, this trend is perfectly suited for those with a penchant for the dramatic.  Tom Ford SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com Blumarine SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com 2. All talk, no trousers Last year it was all about the thigh-grazing micro-mini skirts (thanks to Miu Miu’s SS22 show), but this season we’re seeing designers take things a step further by sending models down the runway pantless. From Blumarine, who had multiple models donning butterfly-shaped underwear, to Tom Ford, who had a plethora of bodysuits and underwear on display, this week’s shows brought new meaning to the saying ‘less is more’.  Prada SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com Blumarine SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com 3. Peek-a-boo Say hello to all things sheer according to this week’s show roster. Leaving little to the imagination, designers debuted a variety of looks made of ultra-sheer materials, including PVC, silk organza and crochet. Ferretti SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com Anteprima SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com 4. White out Nothing says summer like a return to your trusty white wardrobe staples, and it seems that the fashion week runways agree. A medley of white hues stormed the catwalk, ranging from ivory to cream and everything in between.  Del Core SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com Burani SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com 5. All that glitters Much like New York Fashion Week, shimmery embellishments were having a major moment in Milan this week. There was Blumarine, who went heavy on the diamantés; Del Core, who opted for modest crystal beading; and Burani who showcased a spectacle of sequins.
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Why Olivia Cashmore’s new collection is her best one yet
In conversation with Olivia Cashmore on her confident new collection, Quality over Deadlines. Olivia Cashmore. Image: supplied. Good things take time, as the saying goes, and Olivia Cashmore’s latest collection serves as a compelling embodiment of this truth. Despite the apparent quietude on the brand’s Instagram page in recent months, the reality reveals a deliberate pause as Cashmore took the time to crystallise her label’s creative vision moving forward. Today, that vision materialised with the unveiling of her fifth eponymous collection, ‘Quality over Deadlines’. With more than a year having gone by since the release of her previous collection, this release serves as a much-needed dose of sartorial inspiration to those of us who had been feeling her absence.  Before launching her independent label in mid-2021, the designer spent years designing for fellow Kiwi brand Maggie Marilyn, and after two years solo it appears that Cashmore’s aesthetic is more confident and defined than ever. Quality over Deadlines serves as an homage to the busy modern woman, characterised by its crisp tailoring, luscious fabrics and timeless silhouettes – each crafted to be worn for years to come.  Prior to the collection’s launch online today, FQ had the privilege of sitting down with Cashmore. Below, she shares insight into her personal journey, the muses that fuel her creativity, and the positivity in taking a pause. Q&A with designer Olivia Cashmore Tell us a bit about you and your fashion background. For as long as I can remember, I have always loved clothes. My parents tell me that as a young girl I would lay their clothes out for them in the mornings and would even include their accessories and undergarments. Always detail oriented. I started sewing when I was 11 years old and from there my passion grew and grew. During my studies at university I worked for New Zealand label Taylor Boutique gaining knowledge in sales, customer service, production and sampling. After graduating, I worked at Maggie Marilyn, starting off in production and ending in design. I had always dreamed of having my own business one day (although I didn’t think it would be this soon), and so here I am today. It’s not without its fair share of challenges, but I am having lots of fun seeing it grow. Congratulations on your beautiful new collection! Could you please tell us a bit moreabout it and the inspiration behind it? Thank you so much. I stumbled upon these beautiful images of parachutes that were used in an art exhibition. They were light, whimsical and delicate, but enabled a person to fly. That inspired me to use sheer fabrics paired with strong tailored silhouettes. To my mind, reflecting the contrast between the lightness of a parachute yet its ability to hold a person. Delicate yet strong. How long has it been since you’ve launched a collection? Talk us through the process and what your challenges were. The last collection I launched was this time last year – Summer 22/23. This year I have been recutting my most popular styles only. At the end of 2022 when I sat down to design Winter for this year, I was already feeling the underlying pressure to produce a collection. I decided to allow myself the space and time to produce pieces that are worthy to be made. The result is this new collection, however all the pieces will continue to be available as the start of OC staples. On the topic of your collection’s title ‘Quality over Deadlines’ – what made you call it that and what significance does this name hold for you? It’s hard to avoid the sense of ‘trying to keep up’ because of course you need stock to sell but I was cautious of rushing styles through just for the sake of it. Hence the name Quality over Deadlines. This collection feels like such a homecoming for me, in the sense that OC has a clear design direction. I decided to take my time to ensure it is of quality and worth, not just to me but for the customer. Do you have a muse for this collection? Who’s someone you’d love to see wearing it? Is it bad if I say myself?! I wouldn’t offer my customers anything I wouldn’t be happy wearing. But Christine Centenera (Fashion Director of Vogue Australia) has always inspired me. I first startedfollowing her when I was in high school. I had never seen someone style outfits the way she did(does), such an epic combination of casual and formal. I used to try and recreate her outfits withpieces I had in my wardrobe! One day, I’d love to see her in some of my pieces. What’s your favourite piece from the collection? And why do you love it? The Willimena Dress hands down. Shout out to my brilliant pattern maker for bringing my sketch to life. This style for me encapsulates the brand’s aesthetic beautifully. An elegant, timeless piece with a twist. The drape is strategically placed to create an hourglass silhouette which is flattering and sexy. I can’t wait to wear this piece with a pair of flats and heels. How would you describe this collection in three words? Uncompromising, eternal, exquisite. In what ways has your brand identity or vision evolved since you began your label? This collection expresses confidence in the brand’s direction. It epitomises how I describe the brand ‘classic silhouettes combine the luxurious nonchalance of precise masculine tailoring with the comfort and wearability of feminine ease’.

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From the runways to the after parties, here’s what our team will be carrying during New Zealand Fashion Week. Image: launchemtrics.com/spotlight. Early starts and late nights are pretty much a given during the hectic schedule that is New Zealand Fashion Week. With its diverse array of shows, installations, lunches and after parties, the need for a reliable companion becomes paramount. Whether that takes the form of a trusty tote or an elegant clutch, a well-chosen handbag is an indispensable accessory during such weeks. Beyond its ability to provide the finishing touch to an already stellar ensemble, it also serves as a vessel for keeping an assortment of essentials on hand. As our team coordinates their itineraries and plans their outfits, one question remains: what does an FQ editor carry in their handbag during fashion week?   Here’s what they said: Sarah Murray, Editor-in-chief Yu Mei Scrunchie Vi in ‘Day Blue’, $619. With a short ‘scunchie’ handle and a longer one, this works perfectly as a clutch or a cross body. Armani Luminous Silk Foundation, $118, from Smith & Caughey’s. For me this foundation is light and easy to apply. It melts into the skin providing coverage but also lets your skin shine through. Kosas Revealer concealer, $54, from Mecca. A light concealer that you can easily reapply throughout the day.  Charlotte Tilbury Matte Revolution in ‘Pillow Talk’, $59, from Mecca. Just my absolute favourite lipstick at the moment. I wear it most days, and currently am using a darker liner to accentuate the lip line.  Montblanc Notebook #146, $120. I would be lost without my Montblanc notebook to write down notes. Because it’s bright green it’s easy to find in the depth of a big bag, but equally brightens up any desk. Mother Earth Roasted and Salted Cashews. If I have a big day I’ll often take some cashews with me when I need an on-the-go snack.  The Virtue Holy Smoke Parfum 10ml, $69. The Virtues Holy Smoke (10ml) this pint sized pick fits in any bag/pocket. I adore the rich cinnamon bark, clove and tonka bean mix.  Bottega Veneta Sunglasses, $715, from Superette. I wear my Bottega Veneta sunglasses most days – so I wouldn’t go to Fashion Week without them. They’re the kind of choice that seem to go with everything…  July Power Bank. I used various iterations of a charging bank over the years and most barely charge your phone – however upon a top influencer-backed recommendation I’m ordering the July one asap. Let’s just hope it arrives in time…  Louise Dunn, Digital editor Georgia Jay Torta in Chalk, $650. Don’t let its fair hue fool you, this is one of the most low-maintenance bags in my modest repertoire. It has a soft and buttery leather, and slings under your shoulder easily while offering a deceptive amount of storage.  Tatcha The Kissu Lip Mask, $52, from Mecca. Few products can infuse my lips with long-lasting hydration like the Tatcha lip mask. Between coffees, cocktails, and conversations, this little beauty is going to be doing overtime for NZFW.  Guerlain Terracotta Luminizer, $110, from Smith & Caughey’s. This long-wearing powder works like a second skin to warm up my complexion and adds a sweep of shimmer – ideal to apply between shows for a fresh look-alive appearance.  La Mer The Eye Concentrate, $465, from Mecca. For when I need to fool people into believing I’ve had a full eight hours the night before.  NARS Radiant Creamy Concealer in Vanilla, $58, from Mecca. I’m all for practicality. I subbed in this reliable, blendable, and buildable concealer earlier this year when I couldn’t replace a Givenchy rendition –  and I have no temptation to look back.  An Organised Life 2023 A5 Daily Planner, $65. Despite being digital editor, I still go back to a trusty pen and paper to document any clever quips or revelations post-presentation to revisit later. Since An Organised Life closed its doors, this will be my last fashion week with the iconic diary in tow.  Abel Odor Cyan Nori, 15ml, $140. With hints of plant-derived musk, and punchy notes of tangerine and peach for a salty, deep-sea dry-down, this fragrance carries me from morning to evening with ease.  Prada Symbole sunglasses in Camel Beige, $740. I’ve never been particularly precious about sunglasses; I need to be able to fold them and throw them into my bag with next to no care. I bought these when I was in Milan in 2022 and continue to thrash them (even if everyone practically has them now).  BePure InnerStrength, $69. In a bid to curve burnout, I reach for vitamins to keep me afloat. And there’s no brand I trust more than BePure to see me through.  Avene Eau Thermale, 50ml, $13, from Life Pharmacy. More make-up than usual can often increase my skin’s sensitivity. This mist has been my go-to for more than a decade. I recommend it to everyone. Amberley Colby, Editorial assistant Brie Leon Everyday Croissant Bag, $274. On days where I’m out for long periods of time and need to carry a range of things, this bag is my absolute go to. Not only is it chic and complements just about any look, but it can fit all of my essentials and then some.  Dior Addict Lip Glow Oil in ‘Cherry’, $70.  I generally err towards gloss over lipstick, and this Dior one is a staple in my repertoire. Non-sticky, pigmented, hydrating and shiny all at once, this is my hack to the perfect pout.  M.A.C Lustreglass Sheer-Shine Lipstick in ‘Thanks, it’s M.A.C!’, $47. For those moments where I do feel I need a little extra something, I love layering this sheer nude lipstick over my aforementioned gloss. It’s lightweight and ever-so-slightly pearlescent, but not over-the-top.  Tarte Shape Tape Ultra Creamy Concealer, $56, from Sephora. Sadly, the bags under these eyes aren’t Prada, which means a good concealer is a must during a long day of shows. A little goes a long way with this one, so I like keeping one on hand in case I’m in need of a little reviving.  Kikki K Skyline Notebook, $38. With my phone as my calendar, I keep this trusty notebook in my arsenal for scribbling down copious notes throughout the week. Serious Food Co Sea Salt popcorn. When the urge to snack arises, a little crunchy sodium hit usually does the trick. Curio Noir Pablo 4ml Pocket Parfum, $50. With its creamy, smokey and sophisticated scent profile, this mini pocket parfum takes me from day to night with ease.  Lu Goldie Aurelie sunglasses, $129, from Ruby. Less is more for me when it comes to glasses, so I adore the simplicity of these semi-classic cat eye frames. Tangle Teezer Original, $25.95, from Farmers. This mane needs maintenance, so you’ll never catch me anywhere without a hair brush.
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The knitwear collection you need to be investing in now
It’s no secret that Aotearoa is home to a variety of talented knitwear brands, but here’s one that definitely deserves a spot on your radar. Imagery: supplied. Established in 2013 by founder Christina Grant, Perriam is based in the idyllic village of Tarras in the South Island of Aotearoa. Born to a mother and father who owned a sheep station and wool shop in the region, Grant’s love affair with merino dates back as early as childhood, which ultimately led her to follow in their footsteps by founding her own luxury knitwear label.  About the Perriam spring/summer collection This week, the brand unveiled their latest collection for Spring/Summer 23/24 in what is their first ever collaboration with artist and designer Meg Gallagher, whose talents have seen her work in Australia for the likes of Camilla & Marc and Ksubi. With Gallagher helping to guide the direction of the collection, this range draws its tonal inspiration from the idyllic Central Otago landscape which Grant grew up in, featuring a delightfully earthy palette of warm nutmeg, sand, pine and hazelnut. Designed with timelessness and durability in mind, the collection champions a variety of fabrics and silhouettes, including the transeasonal Ultrafine Merino, and the soon-to-be-released Merino Cotton blend seen in crew and v-neck sweaters, collared jerseys, classic t-shirts and tanks. Moving into summer, there will also be several maxi and midi dress styles arriving in lightweight fabrications accompanied by an effortlessly-cool linen suit set that invites year round versatility. Ideal pieces to be worn alone or layered together, each style is crafted to encourage the wearer to pause and feel the fabric, savouring the tactile beauty that natural fibres and quality craftsmanship bring to the clothing.  Imagery: supplied. Imagery: supplied. Perriam's guide to caring for your knitwear While the sun shines brighter during the day, the early mornings and late evenings often leave us feeling a little chilly during the spring season, reminding us not to retire our woolly layers just yet. Merino, with its exceptional ability to adapt to varying body temperatures, is therefore the perfect fibre to invest in during the warmer months – a fact well understood by local knitwear brand, Perriam. Below, they share their expert tips: To remove odours, leave woollen garments outside. They love sunshine and fresh air – just like us. Moth holes happen because wool and other animal fibres contain keratin, which clothes worms love to eat. Be sure to clean your knitwear before you put it away as moths can be attracted to food stains and moisture. Moths also hate lavender, so consider storing your knits with a bag of dried lavender. Pilling is a natural process that can be hard to prevent, caused simply by the rubbing of fibres in a garment. To help prevent it, when you wash your knits, make sure they are inside-out, and don’t use fabric softener. Running a cool iron over a woollen garment after it has been washed and dried can also help smooth the fibres. When pilling does occur, remove pills with a sweater stone. When pilling occurs it isn’t an indication of low quality, it occurs because of the superior softness of the fibres used. Brushing wool with a clothes brush can shake out dirt and dust that dulls its appearance. Imagery: supplied. Want to try the collection in person? Perriam has three stores throughout Aotearoa in Tarras, Wanaka, and Christchurch. 
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Your guide to party dressing this celebration season
Shimmer, spice, and everything nice. Consider this your guide to dressing up this party season. We don’t know about you, but when celebration season rolls around, the best part about receiving an invite to something is having an excuse to dress up. From Christmas lunches, to work functions and New Years’ parties, there are countless opportunities over the coming weeks to bring a bit of drama into your wardrobe. And while there’s no one-size-fits all for party dressing – unless there’s a specific dress code that is – we sure do love bringing in a bit of sparkle.   Be it a bedazzled accoutrement or a timeless LBD, we’ve rounded up just a few of the glamorous sartorial additions you might want to consider for your party wardrobe this season.  Read on below for our shoppable guide. Isabel Marant 'Leila' top, $959, from Workshop Meadowlark ‘Galaxy’ necklace, $2289 Louis Vuitton ‘Blossom’ sandal, $2130 H&M Rabanne ‘Beaded Disc’ earrings, $99 Cadman Rock ‘Warrior’ Hand Hammered bangle, $499 Alaïa pearl belt, $3489, from Faradays Self-Portrait 'Sequinned Tulle' midi dress, $1130, from Net-a-Porter Tiffany & Co ‘Diamond Wire’ bracelet, POA Storm 'Fire Eyes' top, $249 Rolex ‘Explorer 40’ watch, $12,500 H&M Rabanne ‘Sequin Disc’ mini dress, $399 Balenciaga ‘Hourglass’ XS handbag, $10,530 Meadowlark ‘Fizzy’ ring, $3135 Prada Satin cover for Iphone 14 Plus, $825 Pandora ‘Moments Charm’ keyring, $89 Cartier ‘Panthère De Cartier’ watch, $49,800, from Partridge Jewellers Oséree ‘Gem Embellished Chain’ bra, $455, from Mytheresa

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Ostentatious symbols of wealth were far less frequently observed on the recent runways. Is it becoming a no-no to wear your money on your sleeve? Loewe SS16. Image: launchemtrics.com/spotlight. Attendees at the Versace Fall 2023 show held in Los Angeles earlier this year were hard-pressed to spot a Medusa head; the Italian house’s famous logo featured only subtly on buttons and earrings. The clean lines of the rooftop of West Hollywood’s Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood provided the backdrop for a collection that echoed the building’s minimalist form. Instead of Versace’s typical more-is-more offering, celebrity guests (including Elton John, Dua Lipa and Cher) saw sharply tailored suits, streamlined dresses, denim and eveningwear that was glamorous yet restrained. Although sculptural, even the sweeping, floor-length gowns featured a painterly polka-dot print that felt surprisingly demure when styled with satin gloves that hit just below the elbow. “I wanted to go back to the cut and shape of the clothes, to concentrate on the perfect little black dress, the perfect black suit,” said Donatella Versace of her offering — a stark contrast to what we’ve previously seen from the fashion house. Rewind to Pre-Fall 2022, for which Versace collaborated with Fendi’s Kim Jones and Silvia Venturini Fendi, each swapping sides to design 25 looks for a show dubbed Fendi by Versace in a sartorial game of musical chairs that resulted in an explosion of logomania. Varying iterations of logos featured on every one of the 50 looks, in all-over prints, chunky necklaces, shoulder straps, belt buckles, jacket trim, lace, diamantés and more. It was fashion that’s unapologetically flashy, not to mention instantly recognisable. The ‘logomania’ trend first gained traction in the Spring 2016 collections, with brands such as Louis Vuitton, Loewe, Lanvin and Gucci making their logos work overtime. Around this time, it was Gucci’s then creative director Alessandro Michele’s distinct brand of kaleidoscope romanticism that set the tone for fashion’s now-minimalist mood. Today, although logomania still lingers, recent versions are much more subtle. Case in point is the head-to-toe monogrammed Valentino look Zendaya wore to attend the label’s show in Paris late last year. The actor’s bodysuit, blazer and shortswere covered in twinkly Vs, yet somehow seemed low-key. Echoing Versace’s focus on cut and shape, the general mood of the Fall 2023 international runway circuit was one of restraint. Collections predominantly featured black, grey and more grey, silhouettes were dialled down to their essence, and the glitzy looks of yesteryear were nowhere to be seen. Gucci SS16. Image: launchemtrics.com/spotlight. The Miu Miu Fall 2023 collection felt distinctly tamer than seasons past, thanks to sensible silhouettes and a utilitarian palette consisting of khaki, olive and, you guessed it, grey. Just a year earlier, for Fall 2022, model Adut Akech sported a latticework diamanté two-piece layered over a powder-blue bra and bloomers, complete with satin ballet flats that became ‘It’ shoes, “the shoes to be seen in this autumn” according to British Vogue. It’s hard to imagine an item from the Fall 2023 show taking on such popularity, cult status having been rejected in favour of an anonymity of sorts. “A little serious,” was how Miuccia Prada described her show to Vogue Runway reporter Anders Christian Madsen. “I like to embrace that in this moment. Maybe I’m too careful about what’s happening around us, but I can’t leave fashion like some place of nonsense. There’s some excitement and sexiness there, but basically, I think we have to dress for thinking and for starting fresh.” As the cost of living and interest rates continue to rise, so too does the likelihood of a recession. Perhaps that’s what she meant by “serious”. Historically, with a recession comes a wave of minimalist fashion — during the Great Depression in the 1930s, the ritzy flapper dresses of the ’20s were swapped for two-piece suits with lengthened skirts. In the 1990s, clean tailoring and gritty ‘heroin chic’ replaced the razzle-dazzle and shoulder pads of the ’80s economic boom. The crash of 2008 made way for ‘normcore’ and ‘indie sleaze’. In April of this year, the headline of an i-D article by Megan O’Sullivan on the Fall 2023 season read: “The Return of Normie Fashion Marks a Cultural Reset”. It’s a common belief that fashion is a sign of the times, so why, in a climate of looming hardship, are phrases like ‘stealth wealth’ and ‘quiet luxury’ entering the cultural lexicon, stirring up debates around privilege one cashmere sweater at a time? Flashing your cash when people in the world are struggling could be seen as poor taste, but it’s hard to imagine the real-life equivalents of the Succession’s billionaire Roy siblings worrying about anyone but themselves. “She’s brought a ludicrously capacious bag,” said actor Matthew Macfadyen as the show’s Tom Wambsgans, critiquing a woman who had misread the room and brought the accessory to a birthday party at which the unspoken dress code was presumably ‘stealth wealth’. “What’s even in there? Flat shoes for the subway? Her lunch pail? Greg, it’s monstrous. It’s gargantuan. You can take it camping. You can slide it across the floor after a bank job.” The scene went viral, spurring countless memes and TikToks. Around the same time, Gwyneth Paltrow made headlines for the understated outfits she wore to court during her Utah skiing-accident trial. (The price tags were not so understated, including that of the unassuming cashmere sweater by Italian label Loro Piana that retails for around $2585.) “There’s always been something chic about dressing classic and understated; while the [term] might be a fad, it’s always been around,” says New York-based Kiwi stylist Madeleine Hocquard Jones of the ‘quiet luxury’ trend. “You could always buy a white Prada T-shirt for $500. I don’t know how big quiet luxury could ever become when it appears to be exclusive to the wealthiest 3% of the world. It’s hardly aspirational to save all your coins to spend $2000 on a grey cashmere sweater. The idea of being so wealthy that you’ve ascended above the need to display it isn’t new, but it’s more out of touch as a fashion concept today than ever.” Shop these ‘ludicrously-capacious’ bags: Louis Vuitton ‘Neverfull MM’ tote, $3300. Yu Mei ‘Teresa’ tote, $1259. Deadly Ponies ‘Crush’ tote, $999. Mansur Gavriel ‘Everyday Soft’ tote, $795, from Nordstrom. In Aotearoa, an IRD investigation released in April reported that “the data, based on full income information from 311 of our wealthiest citizens, shows that the average person in this group pays an effective tax rate of just 8.9% on their economic income — that is, income from all sources, including capital gains on investments”. In comparison, someone on a salary of $80,000 with no other income would pay more than double that amount of tax. Combine this with the increasing cost of living, and ‘quiet luxury’ and ‘stealth wealth’ feel redundant, concepts reserved for TV screens and the court appearances of the rich and famous. Meanwhile, the luxury resale market is on the rise, providing broader access to luxury goods while also being a barometer of where longevity truly lies when it comes to design. Head of fine jewels, watches and luxury accessories at Webb’s auction house, Christine Power, identifies some key styles in the leathergoods arena. “Quota bags by Hermès are highly sought after as they’re rare and difficult to acquire. We’re seeing a perpetual increase in interest across the New Zealand secondary marketfor [Hermès] ‘Birkin’, ‘Kelly’ and ‘Constance’ bags as purchasing them new often requires a lengthy wait. “We’re also seeing a major uptake in structured bags by Louis Vuitton, including the ‘Pochette Accessories’, the ‘Alma’ and tote styles,” she continues. “Classics from Louis Vuitton continue to hold steady as many people are gearing up to travel. The timeless look of monogrammed ‘Keepall’ and epi-leather options are popular as they’re durable, high-quality and designed to last a lifetime. Caviar-leather flap bags from Chanel are also trending as they’re quality pieces with low supply and high demand.” Maybe Tom Wambsgans was wrong after all. Madeleine Hocquard Jones also sources and collects vintage Chanel, selling a selection of pieces via Instagram account @order_no5. “Chanel is so much more than the clothes — it’s a story,” she says of the label’s unwavering appeal. “It has such a deep heritage and long legacy of being luxurious, meticulous, versatile and glamorous. Its designs endure through every generation, in part because icons of every generation have worn it, from pop stars to royalty. This gives Chanel that great sense of timeless transcendence. It’s never a fad, it’s Chanel, and when you buy Chanel from any era, you’re buying into a legacy we all want to be a part of.” Maybe, rather than getting caught up in a flurry of buzzwords and micro-trends, luxury is best viewed through a lens of longevity. Whether plastered in logos or discreetly tailored, the true value comes in knowing that a piece will stand the test of time, enduring not only in terms of quality but also one’s ever-changing tastes and whims.
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5 trends from Milan Fashion Week that you can wearing
As we say ‘ciao!’ to another Milan Fashion Week, it’s time to take a look at the trends that were dominating the catwalk. Cavalli SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com As another week in the spring/summer ‘24 fashion circuit comes to a close, we’re once again turning our attention to the runways for insight into what’s new and trending for the coming seasons. Home to many of the industry’s most iconic houses (read: Prada, Max Mara, Fendi and Armani), Milan Fashion Week stands as one of the most anticipated weeks in the fashion calendar. While we’re continuing to see established trends such as double denim and leather reign supreme, this week gave us a fresh serving of sartorial trends that have us excited for warmer days. Below, we take you through five trends that have been seen everywhere this week that you can start wearing now. Ferretti SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com Prada SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com 1. Western front If we have one takeaway from Milano, it’s that fringe and tassels are most definitely here to stay. Many iterations of the Western-style trend were seen across the runways this week, including at Alberta Ferretti, Moschino, Cavalli and Prada – to name only a few. Featured on everything from bags to skirts to coat hems, this trend is perfectly suited for those with a penchant for the dramatic.  Tom Ford SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com Blumarine SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com 2. All talk, no trousers Last year it was all about the thigh-grazing micro-mini skirts (thanks to Miu Miu’s SS22 show), but this season we’re seeing designers take things a step further by sending models down the runway pantless. From Blumarine, who had multiple models donning butterfly-shaped underwear, to Tom Ford, who had a plethora of bodysuits and underwear on display, this week’s shows brought new meaning to the saying ‘less is more’.  Prada SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com Blumarine SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com 3. Peek-a-boo Say hello to all things sheer according to this week’s show roster. Leaving little to the imagination, designers debuted a variety of looks made of ultra-sheer materials, including PVC, silk organza and crochet. Ferretti SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com Anteprima SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com 4. White out Nothing says summer like a return to your trusty white wardrobe staples, and it seems that the fashion week runways agree. A medley of white hues stormed the catwalk, ranging from ivory to cream and everything in between.  Del Core SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com Burani SS24. Source: spotlight.launchmetrics.com 5. All that glitters Much like New York Fashion Week, shimmery embellishments were having a major moment in Milan this week. There was Blumarine, who went heavy on the diamantés; Del Core, who opted for modest crystal beading; and Burani who showcased a spectacle of sequins.
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Why Olivia Cashmore’s new collection is her best one yet
In conversation with Olivia Cashmore on her confident new collection, Quality over Deadlines. Olivia Cashmore. Image: supplied. Good things take time, as the saying goes, and Olivia Cashmore’s latest collection serves as a compelling embodiment of this truth. Despite the apparent quietude on the brand’s Instagram page in recent months, the reality reveals a deliberate pause as Cashmore took the time to crystallise her label’s creative vision moving forward. Today, that vision materialised with the unveiling of her fifth eponymous collection, ‘Quality over Deadlines’. With more than a year having gone by since the release of her previous collection, this release serves as a much-needed dose of sartorial inspiration to those of us who had been feeling her absence.  Before launching her independent label in mid-2021, the designer spent years designing for fellow Kiwi brand Maggie Marilyn, and after two years solo it appears that Cashmore’s aesthetic is more confident and defined than ever. Quality over Deadlines serves as an homage to the busy modern woman, characterised by its crisp tailoring, luscious fabrics and timeless silhouettes – each crafted to be worn for years to come.  Prior to the collection’s launch online today, FQ had the privilege of sitting down with Cashmore. Below, she shares insight into her personal journey, the muses that fuel her creativity, and the positivity in taking a pause. Q&A with designer Olivia Cashmore Tell us a bit about you and your fashion background. For as long as I can remember, I have always loved clothes. My parents tell me that as a young girl I would lay their clothes out for them in the mornings and would even include their accessories and undergarments. Always detail oriented. I started sewing when I was 11 years old and from there my passion grew and grew. During my studies at university I worked for New Zealand label Taylor Boutique gaining knowledge in sales, customer service, production and sampling. After graduating, I worked at Maggie Marilyn, starting off in production and ending in design. I had always dreamed of having my own business one day (although I didn’t think it would be this soon), and so here I am today. It’s not without its fair share of challenges, but I am having lots of fun seeing it grow. Congratulations on your beautiful new collection! Could you please tell us a bit moreabout it and the inspiration behind it? Thank you so much. I stumbled upon these beautiful images of parachutes that were used in an art exhibition. They were light, whimsical and delicate, but enabled a person to fly. That inspired me to use sheer fabrics paired with strong tailored silhouettes. To my mind, reflecting the contrast between the lightness of a parachute yet its ability to hold a person. Delicate yet strong. How long has it been since you’ve launched a collection? Talk us through the process and what your challenges were. The last collection I launched was this time last year – Summer 22/23. This year I have been recutting my most popular styles only. At the end of 2022 when I sat down to design Winter for this year, I was already feeling the underlying pressure to produce a collection. I decided to allow myself the space and time to produce pieces that are worthy to be made. The result is this new collection, however all the pieces will continue to be available as the start of OC staples. On the topic of your collection’s title ‘Quality over Deadlines’ – what made you call it that and what significance does this name hold for you? It’s hard to avoid the sense of ‘trying to keep up’ because of course you need stock to sell but I was cautious of rushing styles through just for the sake of it. Hence the name Quality over Deadlines. This collection feels like such a homecoming for me, in the sense that OC has a clear design direction. I decided to take my time to ensure it is of quality and worth, not just to me but for the customer. Do you have a muse for this collection? Who’s someone you’d love to see wearing it? Is it bad if I say myself?! I wouldn’t offer my customers anything I wouldn’t be happy wearing. But Christine Centenera (Fashion Director of Vogue Australia) has always inspired me. I first startedfollowing her when I was in high school. I had never seen someone style outfits the way she did(does), such an epic combination of casual and formal. I used to try and recreate her outfits withpieces I had in my wardrobe! One day, I’d love to see her in some of my pieces. What’s your favourite piece from the collection? And why do you love it? The Willimena Dress hands down. Shout out to my brilliant pattern maker for bringing my sketch to life. This style for me encapsulates the brand’s aesthetic beautifully. An elegant, timeless piece with a twist. The drape is strategically placed to create an hourglass silhouette which is flattering and sexy. I can’t wait to wear this piece with a pair of flats and heels. How would you describe this collection in three words? Uncompromising, eternal, exquisite. In what ways has your brand identity or vision evolved since you began your label? This collection expresses confidence in the brand’s direction. It epitomises how I describe the brand ‘classic silhouettes combine the luxurious nonchalance of precise masculine tailoring with the comfort and wearability of feminine ease’.
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Share tip: How to master the art of shopping second-hand
Got a penchant for pre-loved pieces? Creative director Olivia Spencer shares her top op-shopping tips off the back of a charitable campaign with Dove Hospice. In a world where trends are as fleeting as the weather, and overconsumption is bearing heavily on the planet, second-hand shopping is steadily gaining ground as the preferred option for fashion enthusiasts committed to reducing their carbon footprint. From vintage boutiques to online resale platforms, there’s a multitude of ways to get your preloved fix.   One individual who has mastered the art of finding hidden gems is FQ Friday Muse Olivia Spencer, who recently lent her styling skills to Dove Hospice in a campaign designed to alter perceptions of second-hand shopping. “I’ve always been an op-shopper, and I love the idea of giving new life to second-hand clothing, both for sustainability reasons, but also because there are so many treasures to be found,” says Spencer.  “I wanted to show how second hand clothing can have the gloss and glamour found elsewhere in fashion, and bust that myth that secondhand is less stylish.”  Over the course of a few days, Spencer sifted through styles at Dove Hospice stores throughout Tāmaki Makaurau, curating four looks to complement four different models and their unique personalities. Following the launch of the campaign, FQ sat down with Spencer to glean her insights on navigating the world of second-hand treasures.  Below, she gives us her top five tips to ensure every pre-loved purchase is a perfect match.  1. Take your time Anyone who’s been in a consignment store or op shop before is well aware of the sheer volume to explore, and while it’s easy to get shopper’s fatigue trawling through endless racks, Spencer stresses the importance of taking your time. “Second-hand shopping never works if I’m in a rush,” she explains, “It’s about putting the time in with your searching.”  2. Be in the right mood Shopping is often celebrated for its therapeutic qualities, yet we all know the frustration of trying to assemble an outfit when you aren’t quite in the mood. When it comes to second-hand shopping, particularly, mood matters more than you might think, and for Spencer, being in a positive, creative head space is the best way to find those standout pieces. 3. Try the men’s section The ‘borrowed from the boys’ aesthetic is one we’re seeing a lot on the runways and on social media as of late, and according to Spencer, it’s a great way to diversify your ensemble. “I always hit the men’s racks first,” she says, “That’s where you find the cool oversized shirts and jackets.” 4. Pay attention to fabrics When you’re searching through the racks at a second hand store, don’t just rely on your eyes – your sense of touch can also be a valuable asset. To identify good quality garments, Spencer recommends looking at what they’re made of first. “I’m always first attracted to fabrics – if I see a fabric that catches my eye, I’ll pull it out and have a good look.” High-quality fabrics tend to feel soft, smooth, and substantial. Look out for natural fibres like silk, wool, and cotton, which age better than synthetics and offer unparalleled comfort. 5. Consider your mindset If you’re new to the world of preloved fashion and have by default always purchased new, reconsidering your approach to second-hand shopping can offer a fresh perspective. “I try to think of second-hand stores as no different to any other boutique or fashion store,” says Spencer, “Just because the items are pre-loved doesn’t make them any less appealing to me.” If designer threads are what you’re after, consignment stores like Tatty’s are a great place to try. But if you’re more in the market for thrifty finds, you can’t go past a hospice shop or Salvation Army.
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How to style your go-anywhere, wear-with-anything sneaker
As seen on FQ’s editorial assistant Amberley Colby, a simple white sneaker needn’t be boring to do the job. On the topic of the quintessential summer sneaker, a considered pair can elevate an outfit just as easily as it can dress it down for a casual cool appearance. Opting for ECCO’s Nouvelle silhouette to slip seamlessly in with Amberley’s personal edit, this particular style delivers sneaker comfort in a classic dress shoe shape (note its metal eyelets, thick textile laces, and textured leather finish).  How we style it: Sighted out and about in Tamaki Makaurau/Auckland’s central Grey Lynn and surrounding suburbs, Amberley styles her ECCO Nouvelles with dark denim separates by Kate Sylvester, Georgia Jay baguette bag, and oversized gold Jasmin Sparrow earrings for practical yet chic look. For a more on-duty look, she’ll style them with wide back trousers, a black blazer, and her monochromatic Paris Georgia heart singlet. The Nouvelles have a lugged sole which add a more edgy aesthetic, perfect for Amberley’s style. Amberley wears the ECCO Nouvelle. ECCO Nouvelle 'white', $289.99 How to pick your pair: Though a classic sneaker is universally versatile, that doesn’t mean to say you’re restricted to a plain white pair. Selecting styles which complement your lifestyle and wardrobe will ensure maximum comfort and confidence. Coming into summer, pastels or neutrals will work tirelessly or you could even mix it up with playful prints and colour for a more maximalist expression. For those with a calm, more coastal aesthetic, the Soft 7s in hues like grey rose or air/powder will add a subdued softness to classic pieces. For those who like to hit the pavement or pilates studio often, you may be better suited to a style that reflects your active lifestyle like the Gruuv. And for our leisurely lunchers and shopping boutique strollers, embrace urban details seen in the Street 720s which come in multiple colourways to suit your mood. ECCO Soft 7 'air/powder', $329.99 ECCO Gruuv 'white/light grey', $339.99 ECCO Street 720 W 'multicolour air', $379.99 What to look out for: Quality, ethical manufacture, timeless styles and features designed specifically for comfort or ventilation are all green flags when choosing your summer sneaker. Motivated by Danish minimalism and driven by comfort, ECCO is an ideal starting point for premium sneakers. Most ECCO sneakers are crafted from artisanal leather made in ECCO’s own tanneries using the ECCO Dritan method of reducing water and chemicals used during the leather tanning process. Plus, most styles offer their FLUIDFORM construction which provides soft, flexible, fluid movement and/or PHORENE groove-patterned soles which absorb shock and add bounce for ultra-cushy walking experience. Some of their more active sneakers also feature Goretex waterproofing and 360 degrees of circulation to keep feet temperate. Ideal when battling fluctuating temperatures and climates.
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9 swoon-worthy dresses to wear this wedding season
Secured an invite to a stylish summer wedding? Here’s how you can be the best-dressed guest at your next nuptials. Aje Resort '24. Image: supplied. As the celebration season closes in and our social calendars begin to fill up, it’s the time of year when we inevitably begin to fret over what to wear to the various events on our schedules. Between the dress code briefs and weather considerations, knowing what to wear to a wedding can be a particularly tricky feat. Aside from the obvious rules of not wearing white or dressing to upstage the bride you should always opt for a dress that makes you look great but is comfortable enough for you to let loose on the dance floor.   Whether it’s a casual courtyard soiree, or a regal black-tie affair, if you’re in need of a little inspiration, keep scrolling as we reveal our round up of wedding guest dresses to suit all tastes. Aje Genesis Midi Dress With its romantic pastel hue and elegant bodice ruffle, you’ll turn heads wherever you go in this dreamy full-length Aje number. We recommend pairing it with your favourite gold accessories for a sparkly statement. Aje Genesis Midi Dress, $685. Sir Danseurs Lace Slip Dress Striking the perfect balance between sophisticated and sultry, this floor-grazing silk slip makes a compelling case for lace. Thanks to its timeless cut and quality fabrication, it’s the kind of dress you’ll be able to keep in your repertoire for years to come. Sir Danseurs Lace Slip Dress, $600. Paris Georgia Micah Dress We’re all for a bit of colour when it comes to summer weddings, but sometimes you just can’t beat the classics. Cut from a thick Japanese double sateen, this form fitting dress will perfectly hug your curves while still letting you cut some shapes.  Paris Georgia Micah Dress, $690. Hansen & Gretel Cosmo Dress Serve bubblegum realness in this oh-so-cute mini style by Australian label, Hansen & Gretel. Ideal for the likes of an outdoor cocktail soiree, its iridescent taffeta fabric will catch the light from every angle, making the ideal frock for getting that perfect shot.  Hansen & Gretel Cosmo Dress, $319, from Superette. Maggie Marilyn Challenge Accepted Dress If there’s one designer who knows how to nail eventwear, it’s Maggie Marilyn. This effortlessly refined ‘Challenge Accepted’ style has become a mainstay in the brand’s collection thanks to its flattering bias cut and subtly-sexy silhouette. Currently available in sage, candy floss pink and rose print, we’ll be adding one of each colourway to cart to see us through the wedding season. Maggie Marilyn Challenge Accepted Dress, $850. Ruby Ariel Halter Dress Embrace the exuberance of the occasion with this bold and beautiful ensemble from Ruby. Made from a lightweight breathable cotton, it’s perfectly suited for the summer weather, and looks equally good paired with a platform sandal or a sky-high heel (depending on the dress code).  Ruby Ariel Halter Dress, $299. Leo Lin Brenda Sequin Puff Sleeve Mini Dress Bring the party with you wherever you go in this disco-ready number from Leo Lin. With a medley of shimmery sequins and a voluminous puff-sleeve, your search for a head turning mini ends here. Leo Lin Brenda Sequin Puff Sleeve Mini Dress, $979. Juliette Hogan Lou Dress “Florals? For summer? Groundbreaking”. No, but really – we’re partial to anything floral come wedding season, and this dainty silk style ticks all of our boxes. Crafted from 100% silk and featuring a delightful botanical print, its whimsical silhouette will perfectly match the mood of the occasion. Juliette Hogan Lou Dress, $899. Wynn Hamlyn Dianne Slip Dress Slip styles are not only timeless, but universally elegant. Featuring a plunging cowl neck and figure-skimming bias cut, minimalists will love this simple yet sexy dress by Wynn Hamlyn.  Wynn Hamlyn Dianne Slip Dress, $695.

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